The Inhumane Treatment of Animals

Past recalls have revealed several issues in the meat industry. Flaws in the supervision and inspection of USDA facilities have been identified as part of the problem. How could such inhumane practices be tolerated at a USDA facility?

Robert Mueller · March 10, 2020

Inhumane Treatment of Animals 

Past recalls have revealed several issues in the meat industry.  Flaws in the supervision and inspection of USDA facilities have been identified as part of the problem. How could such inhumane practices be tolerated at a USDA facility?  Recalls should open the eyes of regulating agencies to develop stronger and enforceable standards of inspection for slaughter. If a producer processing animals through a USDA slaughter facility has an animal that is fit for process for human food and it meets the inspections standards for slaughter, then the producer gets full market price for his animal.  This is contrary for a farmer that has an animal which is considered marginal for reasons of sickness, disease or other physical malad; the animal is considered (a downer cow).  

The general rule of thumb is that if the animal is able, on it’s own forward movement, and alive before slaughter - it is considered a live kill (human edible animal).  Once the animal is slaughtered it has to also pass the physical inspection of a USDA inspector. 

The difference between the two different animals is obviously the price.  The farmer may get full market price for a healthy cow and only get ten cents on the dollar if the animal doesn’t make the cut.  This opens the door for all kinds of inappropriate processing of an animal through the slaughter process.  

As a major producer of USDA human edible beef products for inclusion in our dog food, we pride ourselves with the quality of our products.  We work with reputable USDA facilities. We must rely on the USDA inspection processes to assure quality products. 

Recalls will result in tightening the regulations and inspection processes for all USDA processing facilities so that we can all be proud of the humane treatment of all animals and belief in the value of the USDA inspection process. 

Raw Food Tip:

A protein can be deficient in two areas. It can be poor quality because it lacks one or more of the essential amino acids, and it can be poor quality because your dog is unable to digest and absorb it easily. A common example of a poor quality protein, deficient in both ways is the protein present in most dry dog food or any diet constructed mainly from cereals . This results in digestive problems in the animal.

- Robert Mueller, Sr.

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Robert Mueller

Robert Mueller

Robert Mueller, BSc, Pharm. is a registered pharmacist, author of “Living Enzymes: The World’s Best Kept Pet Food Secret”, and co-developer of BARF World’s BARF Diets® patties, nuggets and supplements – the first company to make the Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (BARF®) diet conveniently available to animals everywhere. To receive more articles like these in your email inbox,click here to sign up for “The Intelligent Pet” weekly e-zine absolutely FREE!

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What is BARF?

"BARF®" is our acronym that means Biologically Appropriate Raw Food. It is a complete and carefully balanced blend of raw meat, fruits, vegetables and bone. Our formula mimics what nature has designed our pet's to thrive on in the wild. The result is a pet free of allergies, digestive problems, and full of life!